Tory disdain for democracy reduces Parliament to a talking shop

Ramblings of an Ordinary Man

Older heads than mine may be able to remember a more shambolic and inept government than that of Theresa May. I can’t. However, if that were the only problem, we’d have seen the back of them by now.

Their naked cruelty and obvious disdain for the majority in society marks them out as a clear and present danger to the well-being and prosperity of millions. Can anyone now doubt the basic truth of this statement? However, the handling of the opposition debate on Universal Credit suggests they may be a threat to democracy its self.

This is a party so wedded to austerity, that they are willing to ignore the will of the people, parliament and members of their own party, in order to implement a roll out of Universal Credit. Despite dire warnings that the system will lead to real hardship for some of the most vulnerable people in…

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‘How should cities deal with legacies of guilt?’ – a response to the Bristol Festival of Ideas event

This bloke is worth following – a very thoughtful person indeed.

Agent of History

pron

Dear reader,

I haven’t been blogging in recent months. I don’t feel I have much to say.

I have now moved to Bristol and I and my family are gradually settling in. The legacy of slavery looms large here and has loomed larger in recent years. The controversy of street and building names and, of course, monuments to slave-owners – most notably to Edward Coulston – has arisen here, not with the overt violence seen in the US, but still with anger, passion, and division.

statue-of-edward-colston

This morning, I attended an event entitled ‘How should cities deal with legacies of guilt? at the Watershed in Bristol. The event was of the Festival of the Future City itself presented by the Bristol Festival of Ideas. It was hosted by historian David Olusoga who facilitated a discussion between Tim Cole, a historian of the politics of memory of…

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Dousing the Fires, Part Five – only love can overcome

Thanks Joel

Agent of History

Dousing the fires: On the crisis of hegemony, the forthcoming war of manoeuvre, and how only love can win this war

Part Five: Only love shall overcome

As usual, you can listen to this blogpost here…

In the previous article (part four of five), I predicted that, on the election of a progressive government, the combined factions of the state and capitalist class (financial, corporate, and media) would orchestrate a full-blown attack on the government and the social movements behind it. They would instigate a total war of manoeuvre, in Gramscian parlance. In this face of this onslaught, what is to be done?

I will answer this age-old question in four ways. It is a four-fold interconnected framework for the democratisation of power and the empowerment of democracy from the level of the state down to the smallest community. Each element of the framework is underpinned by the…

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Dousing the Fires, Part Four – a war of manoeuvre

Agent of History

Dousing the fires: On the crisis of hegemony, the forthcoming war of manoeuvre, and how only love can win this war

Part Four: Predicting the next 12-24 months: an outright war of manoeuvre begins

As usual, you can listen to this blogpost here…

In the previous article (three of five), I offered evidence for how neo-liberalism is dead as a functioning ideology able to construct a hegemonic order and for how dramatic the leftward shift in the ideological landscape in the UK has been in recent months and even weeks. I am now going to do something possibly bold, probably foolish. I will offer a prediction of what I think will happen in the next 12 to 24 months. This prediction is based on my understanding of the history of capitalist crises and of hegemony.

Conservative collapse

I now see very little chance of the Conservative Party surviving the next…

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Dousing the fires: Part Three

Agent of History

Dousing the fires: On the crisis of hegemony, the forthcoming war of manoeuvre, and how only love can win this war

Part Three: The ideological crisis – a crisis of hegemony

As usual, if you prefer to listen to a recording of this blog, you can do so here…

In the previous article (the second of this five-part series), I offered an overview of the profound economic, social, and political crises gripping the UK right now in order to set out the underlying material context provoking the current ideological crisis. In this article (the third of five), I will offer evidence for this ideological crisis, this crisis of hegemony, and how the ideological landscape has been dramatically dragged leftwards in the last two years, decisively and transformatively so by our recent general election.

The ideological crisis – a crisis of hegemony

We are experiencing a profound ideological crisis. What I…

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Dousing the fires, Part Two: The UK’s economic, social, and political crises

Keep them coming Joel

Agent of History

Dousing the fires: On the crisis of hegemony, the forthcoming war of manoeuvre, and how only love can win this war

Part Two: The UK’s economic, social, and political crises

As usual, if you prefer to listen to the blogpost, you can do so below here.

In the first article of this five-part series, I set out my overall argument and presented a brief summary of Antonio Gramsci’s theory of hegemony and how economic crisis (a crisis of capital) destabilises hegemonic orders. In part three, I will offer evidence to show how we’re in deep in a hegemonic crisis and how the ideological landscape has been dragged dramatically leftwards in recent months and weeks. However, first, I need to demonstrate the depth of the economic, social, and political crises provoking this ideological, hegemonic crisis. This is what I do in this second article.

Economic crisis

Let’s start with the UK…

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